Historic Homes in Denver

Historic Homes in Denver

As more and more people flock to Denver, it’s easy to foretell a bright future for our fair city. However, it’s equally important to remember the rich history of the mile-high city. In this blog post, we take a trip through history to look at some of the oldest homes in Denver.

The Molly Brown House

By Self - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1523734
By Self – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1523734

Built in 1887, the Molly Brown House was once the home of the “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” one of the survivors of the Titanic. The home has also been called the House of Lions and currently exists as a museum dedicated to Molly Brown and life in Victorian-era Denver.  Molly and her family moved into the home sometime around 1898, but their busy travelling schedule kept them out of the home a good deal. During these periods, the house was rented out and even served as the governor’s mansion in 1902. Sadly, the house was neglected for a long period of time and was very nearly demolished in the 1970s. Luckily, the Molly Brown House proved to be as “unsinkable” as its namesake and was restored by Historic Denver, Inc. The home is now a registered Historic Place and interested parties can visit the museum and enjoy a guided tour.

Four Mile House Museum

By Jeffrey Beall (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
By Jeffrey Beall (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Built in 1859, the Four Mile House is the oldest standing structure in Denver. Historically, the house was the last stop on the Cherokee Trail before you reached the city and served as an invaluable resting place for travel-weary settlers. In 1864, the home was sold to the Booth brothers, Levi and Mille, who took to building a farm on the landing surrounding the house. The Booths and their descendants continued to live on the land until the 1940s, and in 1975, the city of Denver officially purchased the home and surrounding farmland. Today the Four Mile House is a Denver Landmark and continues to be a popular attraction for tourists.

The Governor’s Residence at the Boettcher Mansion

By The original uploader was Jirodrig at English Wikipedia - Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Xnatedawgx using CommonsHelper., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6341161
By The original upload was from Jirodrig at English Wikipedia – Transferred from en.wikipedia to Commons by Xnatedawgx using CommonsHelper., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6341161

The governor’s mansion has often been referred to as “Colorado’s Home” and has indeed been the home of every Colorado governor since 1960. The home was originally built in 1908 for the widow of the wealthy real estate magnet Walter Scott Cheesman. The home was originally designed to house two families, and these days the house still hosts a variety of events including free tours.